Tuesday, 16 November 2010

Shortgowns and Shortened Gowns

Short gowns were worn for working or informal wear at home. They were popular from the 1760s and into the early 19th century. They were practical and were usually cut in a basic T-shape with triangular shaped inserts added to accomodate the petticoat worn underneath. Some examples from the early 19th century became shaped under the bust with a cord  or seam to follow the cut of the Empire line.

Here are some examples I have made. The printed T-shape shortgown is based on the original example features in 'Costume Close Up' by Linda Baumgarten and John Watson with Florine Carr. The two yellow examples are cut to a dress bodice pattern and fitted with a cord in the neckline and under the bust. One was cut based on the pattern from Kohler's ' A History of Costume' At the end are two original printed fichu from my collection.





 






8 comments:

Kleidung um 1800 said...

The shortgowns do look beautiful in their simplicity, especailly the yellow one is very appealing. Your clothes highly resemble original period pieces and it seems as if they just stepped out of a museum - just perfect.

Fichu1800 said...

Thank you for your kind comments. Compliments on your blog too

Lauren said...

I adore the yellow short gown! I couldn't agree with Kleidung um 1800 more. You clothes are outstanding!

Welmoed said...

These shortgowns really look great! I believe I've seen you once wearing the t-shaped one and it even looked better on you!
What kind of fabrics did u use? Was it easy to find those original fichu's? And do you still use them?

Fichu1800 said...

Thanks @ Welmoed, for the T-shaped shortgown I used a block printed Indian fabric which I dyed using tea to take the colour down. It was a pale green colour which I though was not suitable for the period. For the other two they were made from printed and striped cottons purchased from The Cloth House in Berwick Street London.

Fichu1800 said...

I forgot to add, the fichus came from an antique textile market in London. I have not seen any early ones recently. I do wear them as they are quite robust.

Sandi said...

Echoing what someone else has already said, that your creations look like originals, I hope very much that I too will one day be able to create garment to your high standard.

I am just about to make a simple drawstring roundgown, and hope it will turn out OK. Then I will attempt a cross-over short gown to go with it.

Your blog is inpiring me to practice, practice, practice, and hone my needleworking skills.

Kleidung um 1800 said...

You've mentioned that you dyed the cotton with tea. Do you have any experience with tea and silk/silk taffeta? I wonder wether it works, too.
Sabine